Our EV3DEV / C++ Daisy Chain unlocks additional functionality

In our current layout, we have two Lego constructions that require more than 4 motors and we use the daisy chain function for that. In case you don’t know: the daisy chain functionality offers you the possibility to connect up to 4 EV3 bricks, one master and 1, 2 or 3 slave bricks. You program the master brick as usual, but you can also access the motors and sensors as if they were connected to the master brick. So you can access a maximum of 16 motors and the same number of sensors. That is the theory, in practice this is unfortunately not the case. The Lego software is very buggy. Most of the time, the sensors of the slave brick(s) are not seen by the master brick, motors are ok-ish. If you only use motors connected to the slave, it works most of the time. Of course we checked with our Mindstorms friends if there was a solution for this. Their answer: Lego knows about the problem, they are not fixing this. The solution: don’t use daisy chain ….

Anyway, while moving from the standard Mindstorms EV3 programming environment to the EV3DEV / C++ environment, we noticed that EV3DEV doesn’t support the daisy chain option. We searched the internet if somebody else had already implemented the daisy chain functionality in EV3DEV / C++, but that was not the case. So, we had the choice either to split the software and change the PC application (so we don’t need daisy chain), or to implement the daisy chain function in our EV3DEV software. We choose the last option. Of course, it is an additional challenge.

The principle that we want to follow, is basically the same as in the EV3 programming environment: you have one master brick running the application software and one or more slave bricks. The software running on the master brick should be able to access the sensors and motors on the slave brick(s) as if they would be connected to the master.

In order to achieve this, we needed to extend our motor and sensor library with additional methods. For example, you can create a motor like this for the master brick:

// Create a large motor at port C at the local brick (master)
EV3MotorLarge MasterMotorC = EV3MotorLarge(OUTPUT_C);

And we added the option to create a motor for the second, slave brick:

// Create a virtual brick, accessible at the specified IP address
// And create a large motor at port A at the virtual brick (slave)
slaveBrick remoteBrick("192.168.137.4");  
EV3MotorLarge SlaveMotorA = EV3MotorLarge(OUTPUT_A, std::make_shared<RemoteBrick>(slaveBrick));

Once the motors have been created, you can use a master or slave motor in the same way, e.g.

MasterMotorC.OnDegrees(100, 360, Backward);
SlaveMotorA.OnDegrees(100, 360, Forward);

So far, so good and nothing special yet. But as you can see, the creation of the virtual brick is based on an IP address. That implies, that you can also have a slave brick that is not physically connected by an USB cable. If it is connected via Bluetooth or WiFi, it also works! And the number of slave bricks is NOT restricted to a total of 4 (1 master + 3 slaves). In theory, you could have an infinite number of slave bricks. Of course, there is a limit and that will have to do with the performance. I don’t have enough free bricks available to test the performance with 4+ bricks. Something for my backlog ;-).

Apart from the extended number of slave bricks, we have also added the option to access (from the master program) the LED lights on the slave bricks, the sound and the LCD display. In fact, everything we can do on the master brick, we can do on the slave brick(s).

How did we manage to do this? When the remoteBrick class is created, a TCP connection is setup between the master brick and the slave brick. On each slave brick, a generic ‘server’ program is running that accepts commands from the master brick. All commands that need to be executed on the slave brick, are send via a simple protocol by serializing the command into a string (e.g. “CreateLargeMotor,Output_A” or “MotorOnDegrees,100,360,OutputA,Forward”). On the slave side, the string is de-serialized and then executed.

In the current implementation, the server program needs to be started on the slave brick(s) manually. This will also be automated: when the remoteBrick class is created, it will start the server program automatically. Just work in progress ;-).

2 thoughts on “Our EV3DEV / C++ Daisy Chain unlocks additional functionality

  1. WOW! I am a robotics hobbyst from Poland; I got super interested in your daisy-chain implementation! This is probably the only way to run C++ code on such two-brick setup and since it’s my favorite language I’d love to try it; otherwise I will not be buying a second Mindstorms brick. My knowledge of information transfer protocols is, sadly, far too weak to implement this myself. Is there any chance you could share the code? Since the whole EV3dev is open-source, are you considering putting your work in public domain as well?

    1. Hi Krzysztof,

      We have no plans to share the code yet, because the daisy chain implementation is far from ready. It is just a proof of concept, to show that it is possible AND that it opens many more options.

      Hope you find your own way.

      Best regards, Hans

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