How to? EV3’s in Daisy Chain mode plus WiFi

If you have two or more Lego Mindstorms EV3’s in daisy chain mode, it is not possible to use a Wifi connection with the EV3 as well. For our project, we need this functionality. Two embedded software engineers in our team are now updating the firmware to make this work. But are we going to be in time….? From a project management perspective, it is always wise to have a fallback scenario. But is there one….?

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Connecting the NXT to the EV3: use the NXT as remote control for the EV3

In the post of November 11, 2013 (yes, that is quite some time ago) I announced the beta release of the application NXT to EV3 Connection Hub. This application makes it possible to use the NXT as remote control for the EV3.

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Sending data over WiFi between our PC application and the EV3 (part 4)

In the previous article about ‘Sending data over Wifi between our PC application and the EV3, part 3‘, I explained how the workaround works. This part describes the protocol that we are implementing to make sure that all data that is send, is correctly processed.

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Sending data over WiFi between our PC application and the EV3 (part 3)

Dead EndIn the previous post, I wrote that I didn’t manage to get the Direct Commands working that open and read a mailbox. And that I managed to get the workaround working to send data from the EV3 to the PC application. In this part I will tell you more about the other route that I found.

 

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Sending data over WiFi between our PC application and the EV3 (part 2)

As mentioned in the first part of this article, it is possible to send data from the EV3 to the PC application. In this part, I describe how I try to learn the syntax of Direct Command programming. Continue reading

Sending data over WiFi between our PC application and the EV3 (part 1)

Bluetooth and WiFiIn our project, we use 4 NXT and 5 EV3 bricks. Two of the EV3’s will be connected in daisy chain mode, so we need a grand total of eight connections to the PC application. In our version of 2013, we noticed that more Bluetooth connections results in less reliability. Because of that, our hardware architecture is now based on the NXT bricks to connect to the PC via Bluetooth and the EV3 bricks via WiFi. As mentioned in the previous article, the communication will be done by sending messages back and forth using the mailbox mechanism. By this means, we can create intelligent ‘hardware pieces’, that can handle complex instructions. For example, by sending the string “Uncouple” to a train, the responsible NXT brick will independently handle this instruction and controls the needed actions to uncouple the wagon from the train. The string is read by the Read Message Block, both available in the NXT and EV3 programming environment.

The PC application is responsible for connecting the various hardware parts (delivery station, PUI receiver, crane, etc) and the overall intelligence between these parts. This architecture makes it easy to test the several parts (see also the previous article about the test program) independently and gives more flexibility.

The Bluetooth communication was already implemented both for the NXT and the EV3. All we need is an extension that the EV3 can also communicate over the WiFi connection. That doesn’t sound to difficult. In this article you can read about the ugly truth. Continue reading